YOUR Email? Not Really.
The Market Ticker - Commentary on The Capital Markets
Logging in or registering will improve your experience here
Main Navigation
Display list of topics
Sarah's Resources You Should See
Sarah's Blog Buy Sarah's Pictures
Full-Text Search & Archives
Legal Disclaimer

The content on this site is provided without any warranty, express or implied. All opinions expressed on this site are those of the author and may contain errors or omissions.

NO MATERIAL HERE CONSTITUTES "INVESTMENT ADVICE" NOR IS IT A RECOMMENDATION TO BUY OR SELL ANY FINANCIAL INSTRUMENT, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO STOCKS, OPTIONS, BONDS OR FUTURES.

The author may have a position in any company or security mentioned herein. Actions you undertake as a consequence of any analysis, opinion or advertisement on this site are your sole responsibility.

Market charts, when present, used with permission of TD Ameritrade/ThinkOrSwim Inc. Neither TD Ameritrade or ThinkOrSwim have reviewed, approved or disapproved any content herein.

The Market Ticker content may be sent unmodified to lawmakers via print or electronic means or excerpted online for non-commercial purposes provided full attribution is given and the original article source is linked to. Please contact Karl Denninger for reprint permission in other media, to republish full articles, or for any commercial use (which includes any site where advertising is displayed.)

Submissions or tips on matters of economic or political interest may be sent "over the transom" to The Editor at any time. To be considered for publication your submission must include full and correct contact information and be related to an economic or political matter of the day. All submissions become the property of The Market Ticker.

Considering sending spam? Read this first.

2018-07-07 07:00 by Karl Denninger
in Technology , 168 references Ignore this thread
YOUR Email? Not Really.
[Comments enabled]

Gee, this was all in the T&C documents and fairly disclosed and consented to -- right?

Gmail users' private messages are sometimes read by employees at software companies, it has emerged, when the user installs certain apps and grants permission to their Google account.

Though users have to specifically agree to having their emails read when they install the apps, a report from The Wall Street Journal shows that this goes beyond software scanning the contents of email, and includes in some cases human developers reading the messages.

Of course that's clearly stated as ok and agreed to?

Why do I not think so.

Google of course loves this sort of thing, as does Facesucker.

There's never anything private in your email, right?

Tell me again about all the outrage as you buy that next "Alexa" or "Google" speaker and stick in your house where it can and does listen to absolutely everything you say.

Oh, I'm sure it will "only" be used to advertise to you.

Trust me, no company would ever lie, and if they did lie they'd be severely punished..... right?

smiley

Repeat: There is no such thing as "free".

I have my email on my own machines.  Since that's a residential connection and every retail ISP blocks that as being an email end point as do interchange carriers for spam reasons (gee, there's nothing there to investigate by the FTC, right, and what about that alleged "net neutrality" eh?) I pay $5/month to run a "cloud instance" that has a publicly-visible point for same.  Yes, it costs me $60/year.  But it's on infrastructure I control and immediately forwards to my private devices, so there is never a database of emails that can be scanned by either some allegedly "free" service nor that can be broken into said cloud provider or a hacker.  IF said email is sent encrypted then it never touches a "public" device in clear text.  Problem solved.

Go to responses (registration required to post)
 



 
Comments.......
User: Not logged on
Login Register Top Blog Top Blog Topics FAQ
User Info YOUR Email? Not Really. in forum [Market-Ticker]
Whitehat
Posts: 562
Incept: 2017-06-27

The People's Republic of New York
Online
Report This As A Bad Post Add To Your Ignored User List
is it not lovely that ISP's and interchanges block a residential service for an email server for spam purveyor prevention yet they cannot seem to get a handle on the spam problem themselves. have my own methods of preventing spam which work well and one just kind of happened. it is so easy to obtain one's own domains and set up email and implementing your system is not too difficult.

the USPS has toyed with the idea of a citizen email system where one has a dedicated personal email address and similar for small businesses. if they were to ever succeed at this, this little problem with free services would seem quaint. this is a stunt that i could see Amazon pulling as Bozo might be on a vertical integration mission and fancies himself a Henry Ford type who controlled all means of production. big difference, Ford made useful things well.

----------
There are two ways to be rich: One is by acquiring much, and the other is by desiring little.
snow, seasons, distance and dirt roads: SSDD
"Be not deceived; God is not mocked; for whatsoever a man soweth, that shall he also reap" (Gal. 6:7)
Cobra2411
Posts: 11855
Incept: 2007-06-26
A True American Patriot!
Philly P.a.
Report This As A Bad Post Add To Your Ignored User List
What Karl did was to run a small forwarding mail server on a Digital Ocean droplet. Since it's forward only it doesn't require much in resources and runs on their smallest $5/mo server. Then you forward to a non-standard port to the mail server at your house. Viola! No blocking from your ISP...

Or you can spend a touch more and stick it on your own droplet, but... It's still not yours. Hell of a lot more secure than gmail, but still on the cloud.

Look at iRedMail.org

----------
Government: A device that allows you to get blind ass drunk and your children die from alcohol poisoning.
Tickerguy
Posts: 153533
Incept: 2007-06-26
A True American Patriot!
Report This As A Bad Post Add To Your Ignored User List
Yep.

Runs very well on their nice cheap $5/mo option. And it has a very small attack surface as well, since it doesn't actually store anything (thus it's not very attractive to come after, and if penetrated can be easily fixed or even destroyed wholesale and re-created.)

----------
Winding it down.
Peterm99
Posts: 5939
Incept: 2009-03-21

Report This As A Bad Post Add To Your Ignored User List
Tickerguy wrote..
. . . email on my own machines. Since that's a residential connection and every retail ISP blocks that as being an email end point as do interchange carriers . . .
Cobra2411 wrote..
Then you forward to a non-standard port to the mail server at your house. Viola! No blocking from your ISP.
Huh??!!??

ISPs can and do block mail that is sent to/from your personal email server at a residential connection, but they can't (or don't) block email that is forwarded to your personal email server at your residence??? WTF? Obviously, I'm missing something here.

----------
". . . the Constitution has died, the economy welters in irreversible decline, we have perpetual war, all power lies in the hands of the executive, the police are supreme, and a surveillance beyond Orwells imaginings falls into place." - Fred Reed
Tickerguy
Posts: 153533
Incept: 2007-06-26
A True American Patriot!
Report This As A Bad Post Add To Your Ignored User List
Port 25 (the SMTP port) is blocked but other ports are not (you CAN'T block them generally or nothing would work at all!)

But nobody else will know how to talk to it, so you need a "visible" place with a standard listener that can forward to the "real" one on a non-standard port. AND, you have to be careful how you do that or it can (and WILL, almost-instantly) be abused for mass-spam, which will result in the company shutting your forwarder down.

The TRUTH is that it's half about spam and half about the ISPs using robots to scan your email stored on THEIR machines, and they SELL that. Google does it and so does damn near everyone else -- and no, they don't fairly disclose that either.

----------
Winding it down.

Peterm99
Posts: 5939
Incept: 2009-03-21

Report This As A Bad Post Add To Your Ignored User List
@TIckerguy -

Thanks for clarifying. All the different uses for various ports and restrictions, etc. have never been very clear for me.

I once tried to block/reconfigure various ports (as suggested by some Mac forum) to protect myself against external attacks and was completely cut off from the outside world until I went back to just using the built-in OS X Firewall function as default. I'm quite certain it's not the safest option, but at least I'm no longer cut off from the internet.

----------
". . . the Constitution has died, the economy welters in irreversible decline, we have perpetual war, all power lies in the hands of the executive, the police are supreme, and a surveillance beyond Orwells imaginings falls into place." - Fred Reed
Cobra2411
Posts: 11855
Incept: 2007-06-26
A True American Patriot!
Philly P.a.
Report This As A Bad Post Add To Your Ignored User List
Peter, it's not a forward as you would do with a mail client, but rather like a mail stop in a big office complex where USPS drops off in one place and someone there takes it the last mile. So your outside mail server receives mail and then sends it on to your local mail server rather than process it there. Your local mail server processes it and that's what you connect to to send and receive from your client (Outlook, etc). Mail from your local server goes to your outside server for final delivery. So your outside server works on standard ports and you use non-standard ports to your local machine so your ISP doesn't know what you're doing.

There's even a way to update your IP address if you have a dynamic IP. Pretty neat and not too hard to setup if you have some computer experience. If you can install Linux you'll be able to do this without too many issues.

----------
Government: A device that allows you to get blind ass drunk and your children die from alcohol poisoning.
Unknownsailor
Posts: 473
Incept: 2009-04-06

Bremerton, WA
Banned
Report This As A Bad Post Add To Your Ignored User List
Not every ISP blocks SMTP, I used to run postfix on a machine on my home network 15 years ago. I had DSL at the time (gotta love fixed IP :D ), through a small regional ISP that catered to techies, and they didn't block anything.

I used squirrelmail to read my mail via the web.

Once I switched to Comcast (DSL was not fast enough any more) that all went away, obviously.
Dcsleeper
Posts: 425
Incept: 2012-10-11

Northern VA
Report This As A Bad Post Add To Your Ignored User List
I assume everything I do is visible to those who would want to see it.
Much easier that way. I have the skills, I just DGAF anymore.

Closing in on curmudgeonly...
Login Register Top Blog Top Blog Topics FAQ